Henry McKenna Bottled in Bond

You know, when it comes to trying new bottles and when one is trying to focus on bargains whenever they come along, you’ve got to pay attention to those sales. When NC ABC listed Henry¬†McKenna Bottled in Bond for sale at $3 off, that put it below $30 for a 750ml. As I always do, I started looking for reviews.

HMK10, as it is often listed in discussion groups, is a topic that evokes a lot of discussion. First, it is a single barrel product. This means that you can buy a bottle today that is phenomenal, and buy one from a different barrel tomorrow that isn’t nearly as good. Second, it is a 10-year age stated bourbon for around $30. Age statements seem to be disappearing as bourbon becomes more popular and distillers are trying to get more product out more quickly.

So off to the local state-run liquor purveyor I go. Over the shelf where the HMK10 was just days ago. Not a bottle on the shelf. Turns out, during some spirits competition, HMK10 won best something or other and people were going crazy for it. I wasn’t interested in it because of some award, but just because it was a 10 year old Bottled-in-Bond, ON SALE,¬† with generally good reviews as long as you got product from a decent barrel. A few days later, I walked into another ABC store and saw a couple of bottles on the shelf, and procured one for the lair.

The aroma is oaky and sweet, with a hint of cinnamon. The taste mirrors the aroma, except sometimes the cinnamon really takes center stage. I have to say that when I first opened the bottle, I didn’t care for it. I would occasionally come back and try it again. By the time I got halfway through the bottle, I started to enjoy it more, but it still isn’t my favorite whiskey to date. It isn’t bad, but I don’t know why so much hype.

Age: 10 years!

Proof: 100 (50% ABV)

Price: $30 for 750ml (on sale)

Buy Again: Probably not. There are a lot of bourbons out there and maybe single barrel isn’t the best bet for me

Rittenhouse Rye

My curiosity with alcohol led me back to trying whiskey after parting ways with it many, many years ago. Back then, I knew nothing about different types of whiskey. Now, during my recent education, I was trying bourbon, and when learning about bourbon I found out that it is usually produced with with varying amounts of corn, rye, and barley. Bourbon must be at least 51% corn, and varying degrees of other grains. The rye adds a spicy flavor to the finished spirit, often a peppery or a cinnamon flavor.

After trying the Old Grand-Dad Bottled in Bond, which has a spicy kick, I found that I liked the spice. So when looking for other things to try, I ran across rye whiskey, which must be at lease 51% rye! An affordable and popular bottle is Rittenhouse Rye. It isn’t as rye forward as some rye whiskeys, some of which are 95% rye.

In Coke, the spicy flavors really work well. I have yet to try it, but I’ve read that an old fashioned be quite good using rye instead of bourbon!

Age: At least 4 years (a bottled-in-bond requirement)

Proof: 100 (50% ABV)

Price: $26 for 750ml

Buy Again: Yes, but I’ll probably try another brand, or something with an even higher rye content

Virgin Bourbon

Virgin Bourbon is a 101-proof, seven year old bourbon with a limited distribution. Rumor has it that is the same or very similar to Old Ezra 101. While I can’t speak to that, I can tell you that is fine as a mixer, but to me it kind of harsh when consumed neat. And not because of the alcohol. It’s just that it seems rough around the edges. I’m not doing much to explain it properly.

Okay, so Evan Williams BiB is right about the same alcohol level, but Virgin doesn’t seem as, balanced, between the heat from the alcohol, the spice from the rye content, and the sweet from then corn. It wasn’t bad. It just wasn’t anything I wanted to buy again. And that folks, is my basic criteria for any bottle…

Age: 7 years

Proof: 101 (50.5% ABV)

Price: $14 for 750ml

Buy Again: No. For just a few dollars more, there are some better bourbons